Assessment

Once again the mission, goals and outcomes for the Mathematics program are as follows.

Mission

Provide high quality programs at the undergraduate level and to provide graduate courses as needed by organizations in the region. Meet the needs of students for careers in business, industry, and government, as well as to prepare students for graduate study.

Goals for the Mathematics Major

Students will understand the structure of mathematical systems, the relationship of mathematics to other disciplines, and the use of mathematics to solve problems.

Valued Student Outcomes for Mathematics Majors

Students graduating with a major in Mathematics or Mathematics Education Majors should:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a mathematical system and be able to build logical arguments based on the assumptions inherent in the system.
  2. Be able to translate real world problems into a mathematical model, analyze the model, and interpret the results using appropriate mathematical methods.
  3. Be able to use appropriate technology to solve mathematics problems and interpret the results.
  4. Be able to express mathematical ideals orally and in writing.

 

Assessment Plan for the Mathematics and Mathematics Education Majors

The Mathematics Department provides an annual assessment in regards to the departments and LEP goals.  The departmental Assessment Committee is charged with the task of interpreting the data collected and reporting to the Chair of the Department. When these reports indicate problems, the Chair may recommend that changes be made or that a deeper assessment be performed.  The timing of assessment is annual: data collected within two weeks of the last day of each term and reports presented no later than the first week of the following Fall term. The metric used for assessment is threefold: embedded questions, course success rate and a capstone assessment test (e.g. Major Field Test). 

Embedded Questions: In consultation with course instructors, the Mathematics Department Assessment Committee will design final or exam questions to test student achievement. Each instructor will include the appropriate question(s) on the course’s final exam. The instructor will then collect data (template Excel documents are provided) and supply these responses to the Mathematic Department Assessment Committee.  The Mathematics Department will develop and maintain a formal set of rubrics and the Assessment committee will use these rubrics to evaluate the student’ solutions to the embedded questions.

Course Success Rates: The department will keep track of the success rates of our majors in a variety of classes.

Capstone assessment test: A capstone assessment exam (currently the Major Field Test) will be given to students who enroll in M480 Mathematics Seminar

The Mathematics department will assess each student outcome at least once every year. The department assessment committee is responsible for providing test questions, analyzing and interpreting data, reporting the results to the department, and making recommendations to the department.

Assessment Report: At the end of every semester, each faculty member teaching an LEP course(s) will be responsible to prepare an excel file per course to record the scores of each student in his/her class on the assessment questions. The excel files will be due approximately two weeks after the last day of the final exams. The faculty members must make arrangements to send their files to the assessment committee, following which; the committee will analyze the data and make it available to the department no later than the first week of the following year.

Responsibilities: Each instructor will collect the students’ responses to the common embedded questions as set by the Assessment Committee. The instructor is responsible for designing and scoring these embedded questions.  Upon grading, the instructor will forward the responses to the Assessment Committee. The Assessment Committee will then analyze the data and develop a formal set of rubrics. The Assessment Committee will use the data to assess overall student achievement of the learning goals (Department Goals and LEP goals;  see “Assessment Topics ”) and prepare a report summarizing its observations.

Recommendations: The Assessment Committee upon analyzing the data will report its findings to the Department. The Department Chair is responsible for acting on the report as well as reporting the results to the Dean, Provost and other interested parties outside the Department.

 

Course Grids

Given below are the course maps for the Mathematics and Mathematics Educataion majors. These grids show how the courses in the curriculum contribute to the program goals.

  Course Course Title
Goals
Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a mathematical system and be able to build logical arguments based on the assumptions inherent in the system Be able to translate real world problems into a mathematical model, analyze the model, and interpret the results using appropriate mathematical methods Be able to use appropriate technology to solve mathematics problems and interpret the results Be able to express mathematical ideals orally and in writing
Required Courses Math 150 Calculus I
I, R
I, R
I, R
I
Math 151 Calculus II
R, A
R, A
R, A
R
Math 200 Intor to Statistics
R
R, A
R, A
R
Math 252 Calculus III
A
A
A
R
Math 320 Foundations of Mathematics
A
A
A
Math 325 Combinatorics
A
A
A
R
Math 350 Differential Equations
A
A
A
A
Math 360 Lineare Algebra
A
A
A
Math 480 Mathematics Seminar
A
A
Three of these four courses Math 430 Probability & Statistics
A
A
A
A
Math 440 Abstract Algebra
A
A
Math 450 Advanced Calculus
A
A
Math 486 Advanced Topics in Mathematics
A
A
Electives Math 300 Modern Geometry
A
A
A
Math 310 Number Theory
A
A
Math 345 Numerical Analysis
A
A
A
Math 305 History of Mathematics
A
A
I = Introduced
R = Reinforced
A = Advanced

 

  Course Course Title Goals
Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of a mathematical system and be able to build logical arguments based on the assumptions inherent in the system Be able to translate real world problems into a mathematical model, analyze the model, and interpret the results using appropriate mathematical methods Be able to use appropriate technology to solve mathematics problems and interpret the results Be able to express mathematical ideals orally and in writing
Required Courses Math 150 Calculus I
I, R
I, R
I, R
I
Math 151 Calculus II
R, A
R, A
R, A
R
Math 200 Intor to Statistics
R
R, A
R, A
R
Math 252 Calculus III
A
A
A
R
Math 300 Modern Geometry
A
A
A
Math 320 Foundations of Mathematics
A
A
A
Math 325 Combinatorics
A
A
A
R
Math 350 Differential Equations
A
A
A
A
Math 360 Lineare Algebra
A
A
A
Math 480 Mathematics Seminar
A
A
Three of the four courses Math 430 Probability & Statistics
A
A
A
A
Math 440 Abstract Algebra
A
A
Math 450 Advanced Calculus
A
A
Math 486 Advanced Topics in Mathematics
A
A
Electives Math 310 Number Theory
A
A
Math 345 Numerical Analysis
A
A
A
Math 305 History of Mathematics
A
A
  I = Introduced
  R = Reinforced
  A = Advanced

 

Assessment of LEP Mathematics Courses

The Liberal Education Committee (LEC) has recently proposed an assessment plan for the Liberal Education Program (LEP). Under the proposed plan, the LEP Mathematics courses would be assessed every three years starting in 2014. Given below in the section of the MTC pertaining to Mathematical/Logical Reasoning. To be part of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MTC) and hence the LEP, a Mathematics course must satisfy at least 51% of the listed competencies. The SMSU Mathematics courses that satisfy the MTC are: MATH 101 Great Ideas of Mathematics, MATH 110 College Algebra, MATH 115 Finite Mathematics, MATH 125 Trig and Special Functions, MATH 135 Precalculus, MATH 150 Calculus 1, and MATH 151 Calculus 2.

MATHEMATICAL/LOGICAL REASONING

GOAL: To increase students' knowledge about mathematical and logical forms of thinking. This will enable students to appreciate the breadth of applications of mathematics, evaluate arguments and detect fallacious reasoning. Students will learn to apply mathematics, logic and/or statistics to help them make decisions in their lives and careers. Minnesota's public higher education systems have agreed that developmental mathematics includes the first three years of a high school mathematics sequence through intermediate algebra. (Recommendation from the intersystem Mathematics Articulation Council. Adopted by all systems in February 1992.)

STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
Students will be able to

a. illustrate historical and contemporary applications of mathematical/logical systems.

b. clearly express mathematical/logical ideas in writing.

c. explain what constitutes a valid mathematical/logical argument (proof).

d. apply higher-order problem-solving and/or modeling strategies.

Last Modified: 5/11/17 11:23 AM