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Designed to introduce the basic studies student to the attitudes and philosophies that relate to creative production in the visual arts and to help develop a positive attitude to the arts through the study of theory, styles of art history, structure and periods of art combined with an active art gallery program.

In this course students explore the visual elements and the organizing principles of design in a 2D context. Various media will be used in studio assignments that investigate concepts covered in lectures and readings. A vocabulary will be established that will enable students to discuss their works in a group setting.

An introduction to three-dimensional design, this course covers vocabulary and basic principles of art through a series of practical assignments designed to develop creative thinking and problem-solving skills. Students will work with various media and studio production methods to produce 3D work. Analysis of work will involve group discussion and formal critiques.

A study of the major themes in biology including the nature of life, genetics, evolution, ecology and biological diversity.

A study of the major themes in biology including the nature of life, genetics, evolution, ecology and biological diversity.

First course in chemistry for students majoring in a science. Topics include chemical and physical properties of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical notation, inorganic nomenclature, stoichiometry, and periodic laws. The required preparation for this course is three years of high school mathematics or MATH 110.

First course in chemistry for students majoring in a science. Topics include chemical and physical properties of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical notation, inorganic nomenclature, stoichiometry, and periodic laws.

Continuation of CHEM 231. Topics include molecular bonding and shapes, equilibrium, kinetics, and acid/base chemistry. Descriptive inorganic chemistry is emphasized. Laboratory work includes experiments related to the lecture material including qualitative inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 231.

Continuation of CHEM 231. Topics include thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, acid/base chemistry, oxidation and reduction, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work includes experiments related to the lecture material including quantitative analysis and qualitative inorganic analysis.

This course teaches the use of verbal and nonverbal communication along with an emphasis on research skills in order to organize and deliver four effective oral presentations: impromptu, informative, persuasive, and a group presentation. Additional emphasis is placed on identifying and overcoming listening barriers.

An overview of mainframe and personal computers. Topics include: application software, the Internet, hardware components and peripheral devices, and data processing.

A survey of current digital technology intended for students not majoring or minoring in Computer Science. Students will gain a better understanding of the digital systems they use every day and learn how to work more efficiently and effectively with computers and computer-based devices.

An introduction to the techniques of programming. Topics include problem solving methods, program design strategies, selection structures, iteration structures, subprograms, recursion, arrays and lists, sorting and searching, object-oriented design and classes. Students will use a popular high-level programming language to write, compile, debug, and document programs. Hands-on laboratory exercises will be integrated into the course. The required preparation is MATH 110 or three years of high school mathematics.

A continuation of COMP 164 with emphasis on the techniques of programming. Topics include problem solving methods, program design strategies, selection structures, iteration structures, subprograms, recursion, arrays and list, sorting and searching, object-oriented design and classes. Students will use a popular high-level programming language to write, compile, debug, and document programs. Hands-on laboratory exercises will be integrated into the course.

An introductory overview of the tools and techniques for extracting knowledge from data. Topics to be covered include Python basics, visualization, sampling, hypothesis testing, estimation, prediction, certainty assessment, and informed decision making. The necessary preparation is three years of high-school mathematics including algebra 2.

Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits), A/F, Introduction to supply and demand analysis; study of competition and monopoly power; resource allocation, pricing and the market system; business and labor regulation; and income distribution. This course requires a mathematical background including two years of high school algebra or MATH 060. Sophomore standing recommended.

National income analysis; determinants of GDP and the level of economic activity; unemployment; inflation and non-inflationary full employment; government spending and taxation; the monetary system and Federal Reserve policy; international trade; and how other economic systems work. This course requires a mathematical background including two years of high school algebra or MATH 060. Sophomore standing is recommended.

An introduction to early childhood, elementary, and secondary education for students interested in teaching. Students will explore their potential for teaching in light of admission criteria and licensure requirements. Includes study of historical and social foundations of education topics such as inquiry into the teaching and learning process, schools in a multicultural and diverse society, the profession of teaching principles of cooperative group learning and cultural differences, communication, and stereotyping. Fifteen hours of field experience is included.

This is an introductory study of child growth and development from conception through adolescence with a concentration on the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional domains of development. Emphasis areas of the course include: historical foundations and theories associated with the study of child development, the research process, the implications of teaching and learning, student diversity and pertinent topics associated with the possible effect of environment and behavior on prenatal development through adolescence.

This course is designed to introduce students to the art and crafting of creative writing. Students will be asked to analyze and compose their own prose and poetry. Though this is not a 'workshop,' students will have the opportunity to share and receive feedback on their work.

This course will enable students to determine a writing purpose, generate ideas to support a topic, determine an audience, develop a focus, and organize a written text, beginning with more personal, or "reflective," writing and moving on to expository writing and argument. At least two papers will involve a research component through which students begin to learn the conventions of citation and documentation. Furthermore, the class will enable students to learn how purpose and audience affect the content, language, and form of a written text. Students must meet minimum writing objectives as determined by the English Department's placement procedures in order to be placed into this course.

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of geography. It covers geographic methods-including cartography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-physical geography, and human geography.

Students will explore food sanitation and safety procedures affecting the individual, the operation, and the facility. This course provides the opportunity for the student to earn the National Restaurant Association ServSafe certificate, which meets the State of Minnesota's requirements for Food Manager Certification.

The course covers the essential principles of computing through the development of socially useful mobile apps. The course will utilize MIT’s App Inventor for app development. In addition to programming and computer science principles, the course is project-based and emphasizes writing, communication, collaboration, and creativity.

This course introduces students to multicultural literature in the U.S. Students read works that explore a range of socio-cultural identities or experiences, such as "race"/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. This course does not count toward a Literature or Creative Writing major.

This course is an introduction to literature through the study of works past and present which explore both the nature of humanity and humanity's relation to the world. The course will introduce students to literature from primarily outside the United States to enable cross-cultural comparisons. Does not count toward a Literature major.

This course introduces students to literature focused on the environment and our relationship to it. The course covers several literary genres and may include both U.S. and non-U.S. writers and environments. This course does not count toward a Literature or Creative Writing major.

This course explores all of the traditional functions performed by business, an introduction of principles and concepts of business, and the framework and environment of our free enterprise system in a global world.

A study of the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics include: equations and inequalities polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs and systems of linear equations. The required preparation is three years of high school mathematics, including at least Algebra II or MATH 060.

Trigonometry, both circular functions and right triangle, trigonometric equations, logarithms, exponential functions, and complex numbers. The required preparation is MATH 110 or three years of high school mathematics not including trigonometry.

A detailed study of mathematics needed for Calculus. Concepts are presented and explored from symbolic, graphical, and numerical perspectives. Basic concepts covered include polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, complex numbers, linear systems, numerical patterns, sequences and series. The required preparation is MATH 110 or three years of high school mathematics, including two years of algebra.

Differential calculus of elementary functions, including applications. Introduction to integration. The required preparation is MATH 125 or MATH 135 or three years of high school mathematics including trigonometry.

Applications of integration. Sequences and series, analytical geometry, parametric equations, polar coordinates, vectors, and geometry of twoand three-space. Prerequisite: MATH 150.

Introduction to measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, frequency distributions, large and small samples, testing of hypotheses, and correlation analysis. Use of computers in statistical analysis. The required preparation is MATH 110 or three years of high school mathematics.

The Concert Band is a one night a week performance ensemble open to all SMSU students regardless of major as well as interested community members. Music selected will include pieces of varying styles and difficulty levels.

The Concert Band is a one night a week performance ensemble open to all SMSU students regardless of major as well as interested community members. Music selected will include pieces of varying styles and difficulty levels.

Personal Fitness class is for students, faculty, and community to experience various fitness opportunities such as jogging, running, weight training, exercise, bicycling, rowing, swimming and the application of these sports in their daily lives in relation to wellness, cardiovascular fitness, strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and stress reduction.

A descriptive and experiential exploration of physics. Topics will be drawn from mechanics, waves, fluids, sound, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. The required preparation for this course is two years of high school mathematics or MATH 060.

A descriptive and experiential exploration of physics. Topics will be drawn from mechanics, waves, fluids, sound, heat, light, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics.

Surveys the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the national government; the role of political parties, interest groups and public opinion. Includes discussion of local and state government and the political uses of the law.

This course surveys content areas of general interest in psychology. Topics include major schools of thought in psychology, development, states of awareness, learning, memory, health and stress, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social issues.

A survey of basic concepts and research areas in sociology, including sociology origins, major theoretical perspectives, research methods, culture, social structure, socialization, group processes, formal organizations, deviance and social control, stratification, racial/ethnic and gender inequality, social institutions, demography, collective behavior, and social change.

Continues to introduce students to the basic vocabulary and structures of Spanish, helps build communicative competence and introduces students to the interconnectivity of the Spanish-speaking world to the world at large. Placement: for students with 2 years or less of high school Spanish or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Continue the development of the four basic language skills. Culture is taught through selected reading in Spanish. Those with sufficient prior preparation may petition to substitute SPAN 311, 312 for any Intermediate Spanish course.

Continue the development of the four basic language skills. Culture is taught through selected reading in Spanish. Those with sufficient prior preparation may petition to substitute SPAN 311, 312 for any Intermediate Spanish course.

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